Let everything that’s been planned come true. Let them believe. And let them have a laugh at their passions. Because what they call passion actually is not some emotional energy, but just the friction between their souls and the outside world. And most important, let them believe in themselves. Let them be helpless like children, because weakness is a great thing, and strength is nothing. When a man is just born, he is weak and flexible. When he dies, he is hard and insensitive. When a tree is growing, it’s tender and pliant. But when it’s dry and hard, it dies. Hardness and strength are death’s companions. Pliancy and weakness are expressions of the freshness of being. Because what has hardened will never win.

Stalker (1979, Andrei Tarkovsky)

(Source: alombredelaguillotine)

vicvondoombwhahaha:

You can’t convince me this raccoon isn’t elegantly playing the deepest sonata you’ll ever hear on a avant garde harp

vicvondoombwhahaha:

You can’t convince me this raccoon isn’t elegantly playing the deepest sonata you’ll ever hear on a avant garde harp

(Source: howdyhannaa)

A tree grew inside my head.
A tree grew in.
Its roots are veins,
its branches nerves,
thoughts its tangled foliage.
Your glance sets it on fire,
and its fruits of shade
are blood oranges
and pomegranates of flame.

Day breaks
in the body’s night.
There, within, inside my head,
the tree speaks.

Come closer—can you hear it?

Octavio Paz, A Tree Within  (via feverfuckery)

(Source: agildedpavlova)

sirloin:

“
“Those who will not reason are bigots, those who cannot are fools, and those who dare not are slaves.”
—Lord Byron

sirloin:

“Those who will not reason are bigots, those who cannot are fools, and those who dare not are slaves.”

—Lord Byron

(Source: fix-your-bow-tie)

artemisdreaming:

Cherry Blossoms and Moon 
Terasaki Kôgyô
Japaneseabout 1890–1910  Image: 118.8 x 46.2 cm (46 3/4 x 18 3/16 in.) Unmounted; ink and light color on silk Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

artemisdreaming:

Cherry Blossoms and Moon 

Terasaki Kôgyô

Japanese
about 1890–1910  Image: 118.8 x 46.2 cm (46 3/4 x 18 3/16 in.)
Unmounted; ink and light color on silk
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

What, then, is truth? A mobile army of metaphors, metonyms, and anthropomorphisms—in short, a sum of human relations which have been enhanced, transposed, and embellished poetically and rhetorically, and which after long use seem firm, canonical, and obligatory to a people: truths are illusions about which one has forgotten that this is what they are; metaphors which are worn out and without sensuous power; coins which have lost their pictures and now matter only as metal, no longer as coins.

Friedrich Nietzsche, On Truth and Lie in an Extra-Moral Sense (via ludimagister)